Civil Rights


Civil Rights | The Claiborne Firm, P.C.

Types of Cases We Handle
  • 42 USC 1983 (Civil Action for Deprivation of Rights)
  • Deliberate Indifference
  • Denial of Business Permit
  • Excessive Force
  • False Arrest
  • First Amendment Retaliation
  • Jail Death
  • Jail Suicide
  • Lack of Care in Jail or Prison
  • Police Misconduct
  • Racial Profiling
  • Sexual Abuse
  • Wrongful Arrest
  • Wrongful Tasing

At the Claiborne Firm, we cherish no principle greater than equal justice under the law for all people, no matter their color, creed, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.

The Claiborne Firm has extensive experience fighting against police abuse, prosecutorial misconduct, and brutal conditions of confinement.

And when the City of Savannah tried to restrict people’s First Amendment rights during Vice President Pence’s St. Patrick’s Day visit, the Claiborne Firm partnered with the ACLU, filed suit, and the city quickly reversed its policy.

The Claiborne Firm’s civil rights work has garnered national attention including stories on the NBC Nightly News, CBS Evening News, and PBS NewsHour.

Following a recent police shooting, The New York Times reported that William R. Claiborne, the founder and managing attorney of the Claiborne Firm, “has emerged as a chief critic of Savannah’s law enforcement culture.”

The New York Times

In 2016, Mr. Claiborne won a settlement from the city over a case in which a white officer used a stun gun on a black man whom the police had misidentified while executing a warrant. In another stun-gun case, Mr. Claiborne and other lawyers are representing the family of Matthew Ajibade, a mentally ill black man who died after a violent confrontation with Chatham County sheriff’s deputies at a local jail. Their lawsuit in federal court alleges that Mr. Ajibade, 21, was shocked four times with the device while strapped to a restraint chair, and then was denied medical attention.

Mr. Claiborne has also filed a state civil racketeering lawsuit that names Mr. Lovett and others and alleges a “takeover” of the police department by corrupt officers who controlled a drug distribution network. (The suit was filed before the department split into separate city and county departments earlier this year.)

The suit describes a continuum of corruption, arguing that the network included members of a police-controlled cocaine smuggling ring who had evaded punishment during a 1990s-era federal probe that led to the arrest of 11 officers.

“Old Racial Divides Exposed in Savannah After a Police Shooting,”
The New York Times, April 29, 2018.

If your civil rights have been violated, call us today to set up a consultation: 912-236-9559.